Lessons Learned. A mum’s letter to her son’s examiner

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Dear Mr. Examiner, 
I didn’t know anything about you before you came to Bahrain as an examiner for the Rock and Pop examinations but I had to check out on your music, especially since you failed my son on his drums’ exams.
All I can say is I really admire your work, and in no way would I ever doubt your talent or question your qualifications as a drummer and an artist. While checking out for your works I really enjoyed your music and I declare myself a fan of jazz.
Unfortunately I don’t share all of my music preferences with my son. He’s much more into rock style. I believe you found out he’s more inclined to rock music if I can guess from your comment on his improvisation performance where you noted that “this was too much in rock style for the specific genre”.
I will put aside this comment although I would be interested to know from you, how wrong would it be for a 10 year old kid to play in “rock style” especially when taking a “Rock and Pop” examination, to result to a fail mark. I’m sorry but didn’t see any comments for this particular song on the technical aspects of his performance and I would say that such a comment pertains to the drummer’s personal style and the examiner’s own music preferences. But that’s just me, so please don’t take the words of an amateur drummer too seriously.
But to the point. My intention with this letter is to actually thank you. Thank you for failing my son. If anything, you have given him a valuable lesson. Not one in drums, but in life. You certainly have taught him that there is injustice in this world. That there are instances that even if we do everything right, something or someone might come along the way and turn things upside down. And this time, just this time, it happens and it won’t be our fault.
I know my son and I know he’s too harsh on judging himself. When I saw his report at first I was hesitant to let him know of his fail marks, afraid he would be deeply hurt and discouraged from picking up the sticks again, especially since he seemed so confident about his performance in the exams and very optimistic for his results, one of the very few times his perfectionist self was really satisfied since the day he embarked on his music learning journey.
Thank you for this slap. Oh, yeah, it did hurt at first. He did cry. He couldn’t understand why this happened. “Why”? “I KNOW I did well”. I knew it too. I was there. I listened. And with the poor sound isolation of the examination room and my tiny musical ear I knew he did great. He certainly didn’t deserve to fail.
So I had to tell him that out of a total of 14 candidates who sat the exams in Bahrain only 3 have passed. Which I guess it’s true. I had to remind him how irritated you seemed at the day of the exams and how we thought and commented on it to be your way of looking “cool” and “strict”. And believe it or not my son would want you to be strict. Very strict. With regards to his learning be it in music, history or science he demands from his tutors that they are strict with him, strict but fair too. He knows that only by challenging his boundaries he can be a better version of himself.
Anyways, as a last resort to console him I suggested we should watch one of his favorite movies, “Whiplash” for once more. That calmed him down and made him realize that whatever other people say about you, however they null your expectations and dreams, you have to “upbeat” them by trying harder and believing in yourself.
I can’t thank you enough for this lesson on injustice. Nevertheless, as a mum I also had to teach my son a lesson out of his experience. And my lesson had to do with people’s reaction to injustice. I had to show him that no injustice should remain in the dark. That when we see injustice we have to take all necessary steps to correct it and make sure it won’t happen again. That justice should at least be given a chance.
So I hope you don’t mind that I had to report to the examination center for an investigation on my son’s marks and inconsistent comments. Of course I had to put down all the details of the examination so I had to report that on that day you seemed a little “too” nervous. I didn’t mention that as per rumors you had some issues with your arrival or accommodation in Bahrain cause this would be simply gossip, but I had to mention that when it was my son’s turn to take the exam, and with a 30 mins delay, you sent him back out of the examination room and decided he would be examined last on the list on the grounds that he’s “left handed” and you needed to “save time”. I don’t know if being a left handed is considered an impairment to you, but then again in the next minute or so, you changed your mind and asked him back in, so luckily my son didn’t have to wait for another couple of hours for the 10 seconds he needed to place his floor tom and ride from right to left. That would be “unfair” for him waiting that long to simply fail, don’t you think?
I really felt obliged to return the favor back to you. So there you have it. My thank you and a lesson: Never underestimate a mum’s sense of justice.
Honestly wishing you the best of luck in your career,
A mum and (amateur) drummer.

Why I don’t shop in Bahrain anymore

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It has been a long time since I visited any of the big shopping malls in Bahrain. And today I was reminded once again why I haven’t done so all this time. You see, I happen to travel a lot and get informed on the latest fashion, products and/or prices. I always look for the best quality and price and I value customer service relationships a great deal. I talk with shops’ representatives all around the world and I have gained their trust and respect as they have gained mine.
Unfortunately, except for a couple of businesses, this is not the case with Bahrain. The last few years the products’ selection is minimal and in fashion it happens that all you can find on the shelves is last year’s stock often with a “New Collection” price tag. Few months ago my friend bought a pair of Valentino pumps at 50% off, a 50% off that was actually the original price in any of the big online shops. I was surprised when once I went to Saks to buy a pair of jeans and they only had to show me TWO (yes only TWO!) brand codes. I have quit long time ago shopping clothes for my kids in Bahrain since the day I discovered the US prices were instantly transformed into BD, tripling them compared to the US: Bye Bye Tommy Hilfiger, Juicy Couture, GAP, see you online or when i visit the US.
Other times you may find newly released electronic gadgets are insanely expensive, like when the new iPhone 5s was introduced and the golden colored one cost 150 dinars more than its silver version in a non Apple-approved shop in City Center. Or you may find that the expensive watch (i.e. Cartier) you intend to buy as tax-free (supposedly there is no tax in Bahrain, right?) costs more than in any other decent jewelry shop in Europe where a generous tax is imposed…  And let us not talk about the prices in the supermarket or the trick of “.. oh sorry! the price has changed and the tag is still not updated” if you ever spot the difference.
So what’s going on?
Profiteering to the point of disgust.
Ok. I can understand that the market of Bahrain, being it small, cannot absorb the aftershock of a global financial crisis thus the limited variety in their imports. Businesses are afraid to be exposed and they have right. What I don’t understand is their obsession of profiteering even in such market conditions when their actions can only guarantee further loss in the long run. Let me explain.
This morning I went to i-Machines to look for an original iPad case for my son. My jaw dropped when I saw the price, especially since I had checked before with Apple Store in the US:
Bahrain price: 50 Dinars meaning approx. 133 dollars with today’s rate according to xe.com.
How much does the exact same case cost in Apple store?
US price: 79 Dollars. YES 79 Dollars.
Do the math yourself adding boldly the shipping cost to Bahrain (that’s what they always provide as an excuse for the high prices, they cannot blame “taxes”cause there is supposedly a free-trade agreement between US and Bahrain) and you see there’s still a big price difference. You don’t have to be a genius to figure it out. The same profit margin seems to apply for another couple of items I checked  with the store (mini iPad, earphones etc).
Needless to say I left the store empty handed. Then I thought I might check for a mascara. During my recent trip to Greece I forgot to buy my mascara from the beauty store and didn’t have the time to get it from Athens airport too so I thought I will get it in Bahrain. Ha. Wrong.
I went to Debenhams and asked for my usual Yves Saint Laurent one (Baby Doll). The lady told me it was 21 BD. I wasn’t sure how much I had paid for the exact same mascara in Athens before – certainly much less- but as I needed it now I thought ok, I will get it. So I took it to the cashier where I was asked 22 bd. I told the cashier that the sales lady told me 21 and then I showed her the tag on the mascara packaging clearly stating 21 bd. She told me she was sorry but in her system the price was 22 bd. Once again I left empty handed and my issue was certainly not the 1 bd increase from the sale point to the cashier…
By the way 22 BD = 58,3  USD, 53,48 Euros or 41,17 GBP with again today’s rates from xe.com.
Soon after I came back home I double checked the price of the mascara:  32 Dollars in the US, 25 Euros in Greece, 25 Pounds in the UK.
Honestly I can’t think of a reason why a mascara would cost DOUBLE its price in Bahrain.
What these local businesses don’t get is the fact that consumers in today’s world KNOW and if they don’t know, they certainly have the way to FIND OUT. Almost every consumer has access to the internet today. Big brands with international presence usually apply a universal price with small -if not tiny- fluctuations that reflect any taxes/dues or shipping costs. Anything way above this “universal” price is a rip-off and I certainly don’t want to be passed for a fool. So what can you do?
  1. Be an informed consumer rather than a compulsive one. If you find something you really like in a shop in Bahrain check its price online yourself or have someone else check for you.
  2. Except for items considered “dangerous”, most of your finds in Bahrain can be shipped from online shops abroad straight to your door. In fact there are few shops that offer free express shipping and shops that even deduct the VAT when shipping to Bahrain from Europe. Others include any dues in your total so you don’t have to pay anything for customs’ clearance in Bahrain.
  3. Shipping from US is tax free and there should be no import dues in Bahrain. Unfortunately this does not apply for shipments from Europe. There is a minimum amount set by the customs authorities and when exceeded there are dues based on the cargo type charged to the receiver. (I have tried to find what this minimum is with no success so far, it’s up to the customs’ officer interpretation of the law I guess – sorry for being sarcastic!)
  4. When the online shop doesn’t provide shipping outside of their country you can open an Aramex Shop and Ship account, have your items shipped to your mailbox in the US, UK or any of the big shopping hubs where Aramex provides service and then have your items shipped at a fee to your door. It’s not cheap but it can be proven cheaper than buying your find in Bahrain. Mind you that Aramex recently updated its policy to include the shipping of perfumes in their service. With regards to a mailbox service abroad I personally prefer Borderlinx mainly because of it’s association with DHL who are superfast but also because they offer free repacking of multiple shipments into one to cut-off the shipping cost. Additionally with their concierge service they can buy for you in shops that do not accept foreign credit cards.
  5. If you don’t feel like doing any of these yourself but still want to shop without being ripped off, appoint someone to do them for you. At a small fee a personal shopper can help you with all your needs however small or big and save you time and money. You can email your inquiries: idol@mail.com.
I’m all ears for your stories of shopping horror!
Update1: Please check my comment below as some people seem to have been annoyed by this article.
Update2: In my recent trip to Dubai I have checked the price for the mascara both in Bahrain airport and Sephora Dubai. The price is around 16 BD so Debenhams is more expensive by a whole 6 dinars (aprox. 15 USD/
EUR). Just for one mascara.

#signaturescent : Jo Malone

It was a british scented afternoon, and a warm embrace for the launch of Jo Malone‘s boutique at Bahrain’s City Center Mall. Debbie Wild, Lifestyle Director, traveled all the way from UK and  introduced us all who attended the special event, to the arts of fragrance combining and gift giving in a unique way.

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The set up at Le Meridien’s Baharat Restaurant resembled a family dinner as per Debbie and we couldn’t agree more. The atmosphere was friendly and pleasantly fragrant :). Tea and pastries were served but we were mainly anticipating to open our gifts that were gracefully placed on our plates.

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Velvet Rose and Oud Cologne.

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Although I like smelling it on others, I’m not a fan of Oud but certainly I didn’t expect that it could be tailored to my liking simply by mixing it up with another scent!
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Debbie impressed everyone with her ability to memorize all the names of the guests. And believe me they were many.
After her short talk Debbie invited us at the perfume bar where she helped us experiment with the fragrance combining concept taking into consideration our personal preferences. And surprise – surprise! My new Velvet-Rose & Oud cologne when combined with my favorite Peony and Velvet Blush, becomes so light, sweet and delicious!
After that I wanted more! and more! A crisp and fresh combination from heaven: Wild Bluebell and Red Roses. The combinations are endless and you can experiment online here, although nothing compares to the real deal so better hit Jo Malone’s boutique at City Center for a profound experience. Trust me, your senses will thank you!

Feature in the Unsung Lilly video!

Unsung Lilly is an inspiring pop band from UK. With their music and stance on life Sera, Frankie, Wayne, Allan and Russ, embody many of the values and principles I live by, so it couldn’t but “just be” a love at first sight!

Now if you want to be featured in their new video about self-acceptance visit their blog here and find out how. Act quickly!

For a little inspiration, here is their song “Just Be” which was released last year…

Wake Up!

What would you do if you could turn back the time?

The answer in this short film, 2nd prize winner in Mofilm. Written and Directed by Kostas Karydas, Produced by Dimitris Floros and Vicky Kioutsouki

Wake Up!

source: http://www.mamma365.gr

Design and Architecture International Awards: Dimitris Economou

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Paramythi Cafe Bar
Architect and Interior Designer: Dimitris Economou

Winner of 2012 design Hotel and Property Awards in the bar/ club/ lounge category, Architect and Interior Designer Dimitris Economou is award nominee for yet another year, this time for his project “Paramythi Cafe Bar”.  A big fan of his design work which you can see here, I couldn’t but admire this fresh space designed in his distinct style and I have voted for him. I urge you to do the same!

Unlike any other awards, The Design and Architecture International Awards, hosted by design et al magazine (a leading interior design magazine based in the UK), are not judged by a panel. Instead, the projects are presented online and voting is open to everyone. So if you want to vote for Dimitris Economou too, all you have to do is to click on this link and choose Dimitris Economou Interiors in the bar/ club/ lounge category.

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You have to cast your vote for every other category in the Hotel and Property Awards and include your name and email address for your vote to be valid. design et al also offers a complementary  3 month online subscription if you complete all your details in the online form.

“Paramythi” is the greek word for fairytale, so Dimitris Economou Interiors’ project is described as  ‘a playful cafe-bar’ which follows an imaginative storytelling theme with a series of little intrigues and design elements to help generate a sense of intimacy and reignite those childhood magical moments. You can experience this playful atmosphere when you click on the photos.

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Paramythi Cafe Bar
Architect and Interior Designer: Dimitris Economou

A favourite element is the set of swings that greet customers as they enter the cafe bar. They may choose to enjoy coffee or read a book while swinging from their seats, or rest their imaginations upon the wall of vintage books suspended vertically from the ceiling. The selection of materials is a correlation between raw industrial materials with a touch of rustic warmth. Aztec, tribal patterns in fancy table printings, fill the upper level adding a splash of color and life to the space. Dimitris Economou used his cut out wood furniture in chevrons and ovals to provide both functionality and an elegant touch.

Dimitris Economou Interiors’ projects include big names of the food and entertainment industry like Hard Rock Cafe, Haagen Dazs or even the “m ultra lounge” of Grammy-winning  Dj and producer David Morales. “m ultra lounge” in Mykonos island was the winning project for the Hotel and Property Awards in 2012. I so love the vibrant colors and fell in love with the idea of the red chain curtains!

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“m ultra lounge”
Architect and Interior Designer: Dimitris Economou
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“m ultra lounge”